Nov 252011
 

F. Scott Fitzgerald was right when he declared the rich different from you and me. But today’s super-rich are also different from yesterday’s: more hardworking and meritocratic, but less connected to the nations that granted them opportunity—and the countrymen they are leaving ever further behind.

Stephen Webster/Wonderful Machine

IF YOU HAPPENED to be watching NBC on the first Sunday morning in August last summer, you would have seen something curious. There, on the set of Meet the Press, the host, David Gregory, was interviewing a guest who made a forceful case that the U.S. economy had become “very distorted.” In the wake of the recession, this guest explained, high-income individuals, large banks, and major corporations had experienced a “significant recovery”; the rest of the economy, by contrast—including small businesses and “a very significant amount of the labor force”—was stuck and still struggling. What we were seeing, he argued, was not a single economy at all, but rather “fundamentally two separate types of economy,” increasingly distinct and divergent. Continue reading »

If you think this article is important, share it:
Nov 252011
 

Editor’s Note: Capitalist democracy is an oxymoron.  Capitalism and democracy are intrinsically antithetical. The concept has been entertained (and believed by many) only thanks to constant propaganda, especially in the US, the world’s most heavily self-propagandized nation. Now even establishment voices, like Meyerson, are questioning this fraud. Along with Meyerson’s take on this issue, we also offer a decidedly leftwing analysis by the editors of LIBCOM.ORG, representing a libertarian strain of communism.—PG

ANNOTATED

The growing tension between capitalism and democracy
By 

Do capitalism and democracy conflict? Does each weaken the other?

To the American ear, these questions sound bizarre. Capitalism and democracy are bound together like Siamese twins, are they not? That was our mantra during the Cold War, when it was abundantly (!)  clear that communism and democracy were incompatible. After the Cold War ended, though, things grew murkier. Recall that virtually every U.S. chief executive and every U.S. president (two Bushes and one Clinton, in particular) told us that bringing capitalism to China would democratize China. Continue reading »

If you think this article is important, share it:
Nov 252011
 

Change is a Messy Affair, But it Has to be Done
By Vincent L. Guarisco

“I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.” ~~~ Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826)

Is it just me?…Or is it getting crazy out there? I guess if you want honest press, you have to own one? If it weren’t so painful to see our nation gutted in all sectors, it would almost be laughable to hear our lap-dog media say the Occupy movement has not made any clear demands. Or how disorganized we are. But this is how today’s media gas-bags operate. Pure and simple, they blatantly twist, distort and outright lie. It’s the same old propaganda tactic used time and again by corporate media that, woefully, is owned and operated by the same financial gluttons we are fighting. Continue reading »

If you think this article is important, share it:
Nov 252011
 

By David Atkins, Hullabaloo 
[Annotated] 

Paul Krugman has a great op-ed today with a reminder that it’s not just the 1% that is the problem, but the upper one tenth of one percent of Americans who constitute the biggest problem. It’s an issue that Hacker and Pierson [and Patrice Greanville, editor of The Greanville Post] have covered at some length, as has Matt Taibbi. The rewards of our skewed economy increase exponentially as you approach the top of the income chart. Continue reading »

If you think this article is important, share it:
Nov 252011
 

By Randall Amster

As the Occupy Movement gains strength and garners worldwide support, the predominant anti-OWS tactic of authority is becoming clear: decimate as many Occupy camps as possible, in the hope that this delivers a fatal blow to the movement’s momentum. It is an outmoded, heavy-handed tack, one that starkly illuminates the gap between the casual brutality of the 1% and the core aspirations of the 99%.

And it will ultimately fail. Continue reading »

If you think this article is important, share it: