Category: ANIMAL DEFENDERS

Bad News for Those of Us Who Like Meat—We’re Doing Ourselves in and the Planet, too.

LEE CAMP—Most people knew deep down that slavery was wrong, but they were fed dozens of different reasons to keep it going. They were told all kinds of crap science, crap history and distorted Bible verses. Now imagine if—on top of that—in the 1800s there had been television commercials constantly inundating the public with how great slavery is. How it’s normal and wonderful and delicious and you can sprinkle slavery on top of your chocolate. Would it have lasted another 30 or 50 years? Maybe.

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Finally a break for the hens—not much, but something to cheer—Vegan Just Egg to Make Its Debut at Veggie Grill and Retailers, Like Wegmans, Across the U.S.

Industrialized animal agriculture is responsible for mass deforestation, species extinction, gross air and water pollution, and climate change, and it contributes more greenhouse gas emissions than the entire transportation sector combined. Considering all this, Just Egg has the potential to be a major game-changer in the food space and help consumers lessen the impact of their carbon footprint.

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New Information on 2017 Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Deaths Should Nix Trophy Hunting in Core Habitat

LOUISA WILLCOX—In grade school, I was taught that our democratic society depends on citizen access to good information to make good choices. That in order for journalists and citizens to serve their function as watchdogs, government must be transparent, both in terms of information used and in processes employed to reach decisions. And that science involves a healthy debate about what conclusions are best supported by the data at hand.

I was also taught that totalitarian regimes are obsessed with controlling the flow of information. So, I was puzzled to discover how tightly controlled information about grizzly bears was, and still is, by managers, and how opaque decision processes are, especially after delisting.

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Under the Gun—our grizzlies once again in the firing range.

The states may ban hunting bears with cubs, as the memorandum of understanding between the three states outlines (Montana’s plan would only allow hunting of solitary animals). They may also ban hunting during the part of the year when females, who emerge from dens later and go into hibernation earlier, are more likely to be killed (Montana’s plan would do this). But mother bears, upon which the survival of the Greater Yellowstone grizzlies depend, could still be taken. That includes 399, until now so adept at living with people.

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