Category: Animal sacrifice

Climate Change and the Limits of Reason

MICHAEL F. DUGGAN—Humankind is a runaway project. With a world population of more than 7.3 billion, we are a Malthusian plague species. This is not a condemnation or indictment, nor some kind of ironic boast. It is an observable fact. The evidence is now overwhelming that we stand at a crossroads of history and of natural history, of nature and our own nature. The fact that unfolding catastrophic change is literally in the air is undeniable. But before we can devise solutions of mitigation, we have to admit that there is a problem.

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USN submarine research killing whales and other marine life

There has been an unprecedented amount of marine-life washing up on shores by the thousands either dead or dying. When still alive, they appeared in most cases to be clearly disoriented. Ones that were helped back to the water would only find themselves right back on the beach, and in some cases internal and external trauma was apparent; periodically dolphins and even whales have been found with perforated ear drums. Some showing up dead with dozens of pounds of toxic plastic waste inside their stomachs. The timeline of these unusual events perfectly coincide with the US Navy’s planned five-year test of underwater sonar and sonic weaponry that commenced in 2014 and will last until 2019. One weapon being tested manipulates a tiny ball of plasma to produce incredible noise.

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Why (Mostly) Men Trophy Hunt: a Biocultural Explanation

MAXIMILIAN WERNER—While these findings and this anecdote may illuminate the personalities or mindsets of trophy hunters, they don’t address why this mindset may exist in the first place. For that we can look at Why men trophy hunt, a paper by Evolutionary Anthropologists Brian Codding and Kristen Hawkes, and Chris Darimont, a Conservation Scientist at the University of Victoria. After finding the current hypotheses for why men trophy hunt (for meat, recreation, population control, among other apparent benefits) incomplete or implausible, Darimont, Hawkes, and Codding offer an evolutionary explanation for what they describe as this “perplexing activity.”

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